Article 224-232 Indian Constitution 1949 (with amendments)

Preamble Article 1-4 (THE UNION AND ITS TERRITORY) Article 5-11 (CITIZENSHIP) Article 12-13 (General) Article 14-18 (Right to Equality) Article 19-22 (Right to Freedom) Article 23-24 (Right against Exploitation) Article 25-28 (Right to Freedom of Religion) Article 29-31 (Cultural and Educational Rights) Article 31A-31D (Saving of Certain Laws) Article 32-35 (Right to Constitutional Remedies) Article 36-43B Article 44-51 Article 51A (Fundamental duties) Article 52-61 Article 62-71 Article 72-78 Article 79-88 Article 89-98 (Officers of Parliament) Article 99-100 (Conduct of Business) Article 101-104 (Disqualifications of Members) Article 105-106 (Powers, Privileges and Immunities of Parliament and its Member) Article 107-111 (Legislative Procedure) Article 112-117 (Procedure in Financial Matters) Article 118-122 (Procedure Generally) Article 123 (Power of President to promulgate Ordinances during recess of Parliament) Article 124-131A Article 132-139A Article 140-147 Article 148-151 (COMPTROLLER AND AUDITOR-GENERAL OF INDIA) Article 152-162 Article 163-167 Article 168-177 (THE STATE LEGISLATURE – General) Article 178-187 (Officers of the State Legislature) Article 188-195 Article 196-201 (Legislative Procedure) Article 202-207 (Procedure in Financial Matters) Article 208-212 (Procedure Generally ) Article 213 (Power of Governor to promulgate Ordinances during recess of Legislature) Article 214-223 Article 224-232 Article 233-237 (SUBORDINATE COURTS ) Article 238-242 Article 243-243G Article 243H-243O Article 243P-243Y Article 243Z-243ZG Article 243ZH-243ZT Article 244-244A (THE SCHEDULED AND TRIBAL AREAS) Article 245-255 (Distribution of Legislative Powers) Article 256-263 Article 264-267 (FINANCE – General) Article 268-281 (Distribution of Revenues between the Union and the States) Article 282-291 (Miscellaneous financial provisions) Article 292-293 (BORROWING) Article 294-300 (Miscellaneous financial provisions) Article 300A-307 Article 308-314 Article 315-323 Article 323A-329A (TRIBUNALS) Article 330-336 (Miscellaneous financial provisions) Article 337-342A (Miscellaneous financial provisions) Article 343-351 (OFFICIAL LANGUAGE) Article 352-360 (EMERGENCY PROVISIONS) Article 361-367 (MISCELLANEOUS) Article 368-371J Article 372-392 Article 393-395 First Schedule Second Schedule Third Schedule Fourth Schedule Fifth Schedule Sixth Schedule Seventh Schedule Eighth Schedule Ninth Schedule Tenth Schedule Eleventh Schedule Twelfth Schedule Appendix I-IV (Not available)

Article 224-232 Indian Constitution 1949

Article 224, 224A, 225, 226, 226A, 227, 228, 228A, 229, 230, 231, 232 of the Constitution of India 1949, among others, are under Chapter V (THE HIGH COURTS IN THE STATES) of Part VI of the Constitution. Part VI is titled ‘THE STATES’.

Article 224 Indian Constitution 1949

Appointment of additional and acting Judges

(1) If by reason of any temporary increase in the business of a High Court or by reason of arrears of work therein, it appears to the President that the number of the Judges of that Court should be for the time being increased, [the President may, in
consultation with the National Judicial Appointments Commission, appoint] duly qualified persons to be additional Judges of the Court for such period not exceeding two years as he may specify.

(2) When any Judge of a High Court other than the Chief Justice is by reason of absence or for any other reason unable to perform the duties of his office or is appointed to act temporarily as Chief Justice, [the President may, in consultation with the National Judicial Appointments Commission, appoint] a duly qualified person to act as a Judge of that Court until the permanent Judge has resumed his duties.

See also  Article 99-100 Indian Constitution 1949 (with amendments)

(3) No person appointed as an additional or acting Judge of a High Court shall hold office after attaining the age of [sixty-two years].]

Article 224A Indian Constitution 1949

Appointment of retired Judges at sittings of High Courts

Notwithstanding anything in this Chapter, [the National Judicial Appointments Commission on a reference made to it by the Chief Justice of a High Court for any State, may with the previous consent of the President], request any person who has held the office of a Judge of that Court or of any other High Court to sit and act as a Judge of the High Court for that State, and every such person so requested shall, while so sitting and acting, be entitled to such allowances as the President may by order determine and have all the jurisdiction, powers and privileges of, but shall not otherwise be deemed to be, a Judge of that High Court:

Provided that nothing in this article shall be deemed to require any such person as aforesaid to sit and act as a Judge of that High Court unless he consents so to do.]

Article 225 Indian Constitution 1949

Jurisdiction of existing High Courts

Subject to the provisions of this Constitution and to the provisions of any law of the appropriate Legislature made by virtue of powers conferred on that Legislature
by this Constitution, the jurisdiction of, and the law administered in, any existing High Court, and the respective powers of the Judges thereof in relation to the administration of justice in the Court, including any power to make rules of Court and to regulate the sittings of the Court and of members thereof sitting alone or in Division Courts, shall be the same as immediately before the commencement of this
Constitution:

[Provided that any restriction to which the exercise of original jurisdiction by any of the High Courts with respect to any matter concerning the revenue or concerning any act ordered or done in the collection thereof was subject immediately before the commencement of this Constitution shall no longer apply to the exercise of such jurisdiction.]

Article 226 Indian Constitution 1949

Power of High Courts to issue certain writs

(1) Notwithstanding anything in article 32, every High Court shall have power, throughout the territories in relation to which it exercises jurisdiction, to issue to any person or authority, including in appropriate cases, any Government, within those territories directions, orders or [writs, including writs in the nature of habeas corpus, mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto and certiorari, or any of them, for the enforcement of any of the rights conferred by Part III and for any other purpose.]

(2) The power conferred by clause (1) to issue directions, orders or writs to any Government, authority or person may also be exercised by any High Court exercising jurisdiction in relation to the territories within which the cause of action, wholly or in part, arises for the exercise of such power, notwithstanding that the seat of such Government or authority or the residence of such person is not within those territories.

[(3) Where any party against whom an interim order, whether by way of injunction or stay or in any other manner, is made on, or in any proceedings relating to, a petition under clause (1), without—
(a) furnishing to such party copies of such petition and all documents in support of the plea for such interim order; and
(b) giving such party an opportunity of being heard, makes an application to the High Court for the vacation of such order and furnishes a copy of such application
to the party in whose favour such order has been made or the counsel of such party, the High Court shall dispose of the application within a period of two weeks from the date on which it is received or from the date on which the copy of such application is so furnished, whichever is later, or where the High Court is closed on the last day of that period, before the expiry of the next day afterwards on which the High Court is open; and if the application is not so disposed of, the interim order shall, on the expiry of that period, or, as the case may be, the expiry of the said next day, stand vacated.]

See also  Article 245-255 Indian Constitution 1949 (with amendments)

[(4)] The power conferred on a High Court by this article shall not be in derogation of the power conferred on the Supreme Court by clause (2) of article 32.]

Article 226A Indian Constitution 1949

[Omitted]

Article 227 Indian Constitution 1949

Power of superintendence over all courts by the High Court

[(1) Every High Court shall have superintendence over all courts and tribunals throughout the territories in relation to which it exercises jurisdiction.]

(2) Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing provision, the High Court may—
(a) call for returns from such courts;
(b) make and issue general rules and prescribe forms for regulating the practice and proceedings of such courts; and
(c) prescribe forms in which books, entries and accounts shall be kept by the officers of any such courts.

(3) The High Court may also settle tables of fees to be allowed to the sheriff and all clerks and officers of such courts and to attorneys, advocates and pleaders practising therein:

Provided that any rules made, forms prescribed or tables settled under clause (2) or clause (3) shall not be inconsistent with the provision of any law for the time being in force, and shall require the previous approval of the Governor.

(4) Nothing in this article shall be deemed to confer on a High Court powers of superintendence over any court or tribunal constituted by or under any law relating to the Armed Forces.

Article 228 Indian Constitution 1949

Transfer of certain cases to High Court

If the High Court is satisfied that a case pending in a court subordinate to it involves a substantial question of law as to the interpretation of this Constitution the
determination of which is necessary for the disposal of the case, [it shall withdraw the case and may—]
(a) either dispose of the case itself, or
(b) determine the said question of law and return the case to the court from which the case has been so withdrawn together with a copy of its judgment on such question, and the said court shall on receipt thereof proceed to dispose of the case in conformity with such judgment.

Article 228A Indian Constitution 1949

[Omitted .]

Article 229 Indian Constitution 1949

Officers and servants and the expenses of High Courts

(1) Appointments of officers and servants of a High Court shall be made by the Chief Justice of the Court or such other Judge or officer of the Court as he may direct:

See also  Article 202-207 Indian Constitution 1949 (with amendments)

Provided that the Governor of the State may by rule require that in such cases as may be specified in the rule no person not already attached to the Court shall be appointed to any office connected with the Court save after consultation with the State Public Service Commission.

(2) Subject to the provisions of any law made by the Legislature of the State, the conditions of service of officers and servants of a High Court shall be such as may be prescribed by rules made by the Chief Justice of the Court or by some other Judge or officer of the Court authorised by the Chief Justice to make rules for the purpose:

Provided that the rules made under this clause shall, so far as they relate to salaries, allowances, leave or pensions, require the approval of the Governor of the State.

(3) The administrative expenses of a High Court, including all salaries, allowances and pensions payable to or in respect of the officers and servants of the Court, shall be charged upon the Consolidated Fund of the State, and any fees or other moneys taken by the Court shall form part of that Fund.

Article 230 Indian Constitution 1949

Extension of jurisdiction of High Courts to Union territories

(1) Parliament may by law extend the jurisdiction of a High Court to, or exclude the jurisdiction of a High Court from, any Union territory.

(2) Where the High Court of a State exercises jurisdiction in relation to a Union territory,—
(a) nothing in this Constitution shall be construed as empowering the Legislature of the State to increase, restrict or abolish that jurisdiction; and
(b) the reference in article 227 to the Governor shall, in relation to any rules, forms or tables for subordinate courts in that territory, be construed as a reference to the President.

Article 231 Indian Constitution 1949

Establishment of a common High Court for two or more States

(1) Notwithstanding anything contained in the preceding provisions of this Chapter, Parliament may by law establish a common High Court for two or more States or for two or more States and a Union territory.

(2) In relation to any such High Court,—

(b) the reference in article 227 to the Governor shall, in relation to any rules, forms or tables for subordinate courts, be construed as a reference to the Governor of the State in which the subordinate courts are situate; and

(c) the references in articles 219 and 229 to the State shall be construed as a reference to the State in which the High Court has its principal seat:

Provided that if such principal seat is in a Union territory, the references in articles 219 and 229 to the Governor, Public Service Commission, Legislature and Consolidated Fund of the State shall be construed respectively as references to the President, Union Public Service Commission, Parliament and Consolidated Fund of India.]

Article 232 Indian Constitution 1949

[Interpretation.-Articles 230, 231 and 232 substituted with articles 230 and 231 by the Constitution (Seventh Amendment) Act, 1956, s. 16 (w.e.f. 1-11-1956).]


See also:

Article 214-223 Indian Constitution 1949

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Inioluwa Olaposi

Hi. I am Inioluwa Olaposi, a legal-tech enthusiast interested in human development. I tweet sometimes.

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